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Panama Fruit Feeder Cam

Discussion in 'The Meadow' started by Satira Capriccio, Jan 2, 2019.

  1. Satira Capriccio

    Satira Capriccio Distinguished CV-BEE Contributing Artist

    Most birds I see at the feeder don't have much problems sharing. They might grab the fruit from another, but they don't cause a scene over it. The Clay-colored Thrushes are the exception. The minute they arrive, the squabbling begins and never stops until they leave.

    There is more than enough fruit for the Flame-rumped Tanagers, even if they voice off to each other a few times. But Clay-colored Thrushes show up and suddenly, there just isn't enough fruit. One Thrush tries to drive everyone away from fruit he isn't even eating.

     
  2. Miss B

    Miss B Drawing Life 1 Pixel at a Time CV-BEE

    Yes, they're the ones I usually see fussing over other species being there. The attendant always puts out a nice amount of food, so why they can't just let the other birds be, I have no idea. I guess they just like to "rule the roost", as it were. ;)
     
  3. Miss B

    Miss B Drawing Life 1 Pixel at a Time CV-BEE

    OK, just spotted this really colorful bird at at the Fruit Feeder, and don't recall if I've ever seen this species before.

    PanamaFruitFeeder-1-23-19A.jpg

    Uh oh, looks like a standoff in the making. ;)

    PanamaFruitFeeder-1-23-19B.jpg
     
    Chris likes this.
  4. Satira Capriccio

    Satira Capriccio Distinguished CV-BEE Contributing Artist

    The Rufous Motmots are absolutely beautiful birds, especially with that fabulous tail. They will stand up to the Clay-colored Thrushes. Most birds I see hang back waiting for the Thrushes to leave, or bravely sneaking in to grab a bit of fruit.
     
  5. Miss B

    Miss B Drawing Life 1 Pixel at a Time CV-BEE

    Ohhhh right! I should've recognized the tip of it's tail. Now I remember seeing it before.
     
  6. Flint_Hawk

    Flint_Hawk Ambitious

    Was any one else lucky enough to see all of the Collared Aracari at the feeder earlier this morning? I counted 8!

    Collared Aracari .jpg
     
    Chris likes this.
  7. Miss B

    Miss B Drawing Life 1 Pixel at a Time CV-BEE

    WOW, good catch Flint! I don't think I've ever seen so many at once. Then again, I'm rarely up "early" in the morning. ;)
     
  8. Satira Capriccio

    Satira Capriccio Distinguished CV-BEE Contributing Artist

    I've been so crazy busy because of work, that even when I'm home I don't tend to think about checking until it's dark!

    Then, it's no fun.
     
  9. Rowan54

    Rowan54 Dragon Queen Contributing Artist

    Someone was complaining that nothing is there in the dark? fruit feeder dark.JPG
     
  10. Chris

    Chris HW3D President Co-Founder

    Oh sweet!!! JACKPOT!!!!

    Nice catch.
     
  11. Flint_Hawk

    Flint_Hawk Ambitious

    I just found that they have posted a clip of all of those Collared Aracari that I got to see-
    Cornell Lab Bird Cams
     
  12. Miss B

    Miss B Drawing Life 1 Pixel at a Time CV-BEE

    OK, here's a species I don't think I've seen before.

    PanamaFruitFeeder-1-30-19.jpg
     
    Chris likes this.
  13. Flint_Hawk

    Flint_Hawk Ambitious

    That's a Chestnut-headed Oropendola Miss B.
     
  14. Miss B

    Miss B Drawing Life 1 Pixel at a Time CV-BEE

    Ohhh, thanks Flint. It has nice distinctive coloring, so I liked it right away.
     
  15. Miss B

    Miss B Drawing Life 1 Pixel at a Time CV-BEE

    Well, I haven't been lucky lately, probably because I'm just not checking at the right time, but I finally was able to get a couple of screenshots a few minutes ago . . .

    PanamaFruitFeeder-3-10-19A.jpg

    and a slightly better one.

    PanamaFruitFeeder-3-10-19B.jpg
     
    Rowan54, DanaTA and Chris like this.
  16. Rowan54

    Rowan54 Dragon Queen Contributing Artist

    I saw that bird a couple days ago, but it didn't get where I could get a good screenshot of it.
     
  17. Miss B

    Miss B Drawing Life 1 Pixel at a Time CV-BEE

    Well, I haven't had much luck getting a good screenshot at the Fruit Feeder lately, but just got one, with the same bird I saw the last time, about a month ago.

    PanamaFruitFeeder-4-11-19.jpg
     
    DanaTA and Janet like this.
  18. Flint_Hawk

    Flint_Hawk Ambitious

    That's a nice capture Miss B.

    I saw a Rufous Motmot this morning which had lost it's magnificent tail feathers.
    115a mot mot-no tail.jpg

    And then I saw - - - a Striped Basilisk!!!
    116d lizard.JPG
     
    Janet likes this.
  19. Miss B

    Miss B Drawing Life 1 Pixel at a Time CV-BEE

    Thanks Flint, as I got lucky. I always have my finger hovering over the Print Screen button when I go to the Bird Feeder, and it was a good thing I did, because he flew away almost immediately.

    I always like the Rufous Motmot's coloring, and is it strange that he lost the long tail feathers, or is that something that happens at a certain age/time of year?

    Don't think I've seen a Striped Basilisk before. His tail looks longer than his body.

    What I really want to know is, what is that "stuff" they covered the perching logs with. It almost looks like some monstrous animal in hibernation.
     
  20. Ken Gilliland

    Ken Gilliland Extraordinary HW3D Exclusive Artist

    From Wikipedia...

    In several species of motmots, the barbs near the ends of the two longest (central) tail feathers are weak and fall off due to abrasion with substrates, or fall off during preening, leaving a length of bare shaft, thus creating the racket shape of the tail. It was however wrongly believed in the past that the motmot shaped its tail by plucking part of the feather web to leave the racket. This was based on inaccurate reports made by Charles William Beebe. It has since been shown that these barbs are weakly attached and fall off due to abrasion with substrates and during routine preening. There are however also several species where the tail is "normal", these being the tody motmot, blue-throated motmot, rufous-capped motmot, and the Amazonian populations of the rufous and broad-billed motmots.
     
    Flint_Hawk likes this.

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