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WIP Work In Progress On Eli

Chris

HW3D President
Staff member
Co-Founder
Don't want to sound to nit-picky but aren't the ankles or tat space between feet and leg a bit thin? Seems with all that weight they should be thicker especially in front legs? I don't know something strikes me as off. Sorry for seeming obtuse! :(
Several references would indicate to me the front foot being modeled as it currently is for our base Eli, as far as the thickness of the leg above the foot (Ankle area). But... I've added in morphs for the front legs and back legs separately to provide more options for folks. Hopefully this will work.

ZZZElephantAnkle.JPG
Eli96.JPG
 

Sparky

Monster Maker
Contributing Artist
Hey, Chris, looking good! Does the elephant have a morph for tushes (small tusks like the ones in the reference image you posted, common to female Asian elephants)?
 

Sparky

Monster Maker
Contributing Artist
Tushes are pretty important to the Asian elephant. Half of Indian Asian elephant females and a significant number of males have tushes, and only about 10% of Sri Lankan males have tusks.
 

Chris

HW3D President
Staff member
Co-Founder
Awesome. Love it. Love the tusks too.

My understanding is the fleshy pink colors come into play the other they get, but I could be wrong.
 
Awesome. Love it. Love the tusks too.

My understanding is the fleshy pink colors come into play the other they get, but I could be wrong.
Actually the dis-pigmentation comes from vitamin deficiency. It is more prevalent in Sri Lankan elephants due to lack of habitat. There are 4 sub species of Asian elephants all broken up by the areas they live in throughout Asia. Main land "Indian" elephants that reside in the northern part of India are the typical cool gray color with little to no pigmentation. The Sri Lankan elephant is the most colorful ranging fro the cool gray to almost black skin with pink to orange pigment patches. Southern Indian elephants are dark gray in coloration with pinkish pigmentation on the belly and on the trunk only. Pygmy elephants will range from cool gray to dark gray and with little to no pigmentation, also they max out a 8ft and some odd inches at shoulder. I Have always loved elephants and have studied them for awhile if you can't tell. :lol:
 
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