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Songbird Remix's Product Preview Thread

Ken Gilliland

Dances with Bees
HW3D Exclusive Artist
Here's some images from a third volume of butterflies I'm working on...
 

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Ken Gilliland

Dances with Bees
HW3D Exclusive Artist
Not really... Flowerpiercers may punch a hole near the base of a flower to gets its nectar, but leaftossers simply toss leaves on the ground hunting for bugs.

Why these birds? I found the names fun (sort of like my "spiderhunters"), so I couldn't resist... Just thinking about doing an image with a bird called a "Tawny-breasted Leaftosser" makes me giggle a little.

An Indigo Flowerpiercer with a Tawny-breasted Leaftosser (up on the limb) checking out his forage area.
Indigo Flowerpiercer.jpg
 

JOdel

Dances with Bees
HW Honey Bear
Rather OT but I was just browsing a tumblr account that I look in on fairly often, and somebody reposted a video regarding the Hooded Pitohui, which I gather is a poisonous bird. Its feathers give off the same neurotoxin as poison dart frogs. I gather they are corvids. Very colorful for corvids, too.
 

Ken Gilliland

Dances with Bees
HW3D Exclusive Artist
My "Flowerpiercers & Leaftossers" is out today.

In a few weeks, expect a fourth installment in the "Threatened Endangered Extinct", in time for Audubon's birthday. This set will have a good variety of birds ranging from the extinct Labrador Duck to threatened stunners like the Banded Cotinga and Scaly Ground-roller
 

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Ken Gilliland

Dances with Bees
HW3D Exclusive Artist
A sneak peak at some of the cast in my upcoming "Threatened Endangered Extinct v4".

Here is the Labrador Duck. It was a sea duck that migrated annually, wintering off the coasts of New Jersey and New England in the eastern United States, where it favored southern sandy coasts, sheltered bays, harbors, and inlets, and breeding in Labrador and northern Quebec in the summer.

It has the distinction of being the first known endemic North American bird species to become extinct after the Columbian Exchange, with the last known sighting occurring in 1878 in Elmira, New York. The Labrador duck is thought to have been always rare, but between 1850 and 1870, populations waned further. Its extinction (sometime after 1878) is still not fully explained. Although hunted for food, this duck was considered to taste bad, rotted quickly, and fetched a low price. Consequently, it was not sought much by hunters. However, the eggs may have been over-harvested, and it may have been subject to depredations by the feather trade in its breeding area, as well. Another possible factor in the bird's extinction was the decline in mussels and other shellfish on which they are believed to have fed in their winter quarters, due to growth of population and industry on the Eastern Seaboard. Although all sea ducks readily feed on shallow-water molluscs, no Western Atlantic bird species seems to have been as dependent on such food as the Labrador duck.

Another theory that was said to lead to their extinction was a huge increase of human influence on the coastal ecosystems in North America, causing the birds to flee their niches and find another habitat. These ducks were the only birds whose range was limited to the American coast of the North Atlantic, so changing niches was a difficult task. Whatever the causes may be, the Labrador duck became extinct in the late 19th century.

The Labrador duck has been considered the most enigmatic of all North American birds. There are 55 specimens of the Labrador duck preserved in museum collections worldwide.
TEE-labrador ducks.jpg

Author Glen Chilton investigated the wherabouts of every known specimen scattered amongst the museums of Europe, North America, and the Middle East, and wrote an captivating book about his search called “The Curse of the Labrador Duck”.
 

Ken Gilliland

Dances with Bees
HW3D Exclusive Artist
Another "Threatened Endangered Extinct v4" preview... this time the endangered Banded Cotingas.

It occurs in southeastern Bahia (in Brazil), with two records from northeast Minas Gerais in 2003 (Santa Maria do Salto and Bandeira municipalities) and none since the 19th century in Rio de Janeiro, south-east Brazil. It was previously easily observed in Espírito Santo, but there have been few, if any, records from the state since the 1990s and it may now be extirpated from the state. It has declined significantly in abundance and distribution and is now mostly confined to a few protected areas, notably RPPN Estação Veracel (formerly known as Estação Veracruz), Porto Seguro, Bahia as well as Reserva Serra Bonita, Camacan, also in Bahia.

There are 50-249 mature individuals left with a decreasing population trend. The main threats to the species are the large-scale destruction of the remaining lowland Atlantic forest and illegal capture for the cage-bird trade. The extensive and continuing deforestation within its range has isolated populations in a few key protected areas. Forest is logged and burned and cleared for conversion to agriculture for crops such as coffee and for grazing. In the past, birds were collected for feather-flower craftwork by local Indians and Bahian nuns. The apparent scarcity of the species in trade during recent decades is probably a consequence of its rarity.

It is a strikingly beautiful, dark blue cotinga. The male has bright, dark cobalt-blue upper-parts, somewhat mottled black on back. The female is dusky brown above scaled whitish. It has slightly paler and buffier under-parts with quite broad scaling, giving a paler appearance.

They eat fruit - predominantly Byrsonima sericea and Ficus species.

TEE-Banded Cotingas.jpg
 
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