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Deer running

Janet

Extraordinary
Contributing Artist
So I've been watching a lot of youtubes with deer running. Sometimes they bounce and other times not. What causes this? Is it a difference between old and young deer? Playful verses serious? So today I googled a deer petting zoo, found their FB link, added them and sent them a message asking those questions. They suggested I call the zoo owner and ask her as she has been hand feeding deer for 30 years. So I did. Turns out different types of deer have different runs! DUH! Also she said that using the word "pronking" for the bounce they do would be appropriate. A pronking deer is a happy deer apparently.

So I will include two runs with my deer package, one that bounces and the other not.
 

HaiGan

Busy Bee
Contributing Artist
My sheep do the 'antelope leap' when they are having a wild five minutes- adults and lambs, although the ones that bounce most are the lambs, followed by the shearlings (year-old sheep), and I've never seen the oldest sheep join in, so not from the age of seven, and apart from the lambs the boys do more than the girls, especially once they're aged two and above. They don't seem to do it when running from a threat, just when hooning around in a bunch around their field and climbing-frame in a way that suggests they are doing it for fun (yes, I have spoiled sheep, they have a series of flat wooden platforms of various heights that they can clamber over). Sheep are not deer, of course, variations among deer may well be different.
 

Janet

Extraordinary
Contributing Artist
What did you call this step when they did it?

I'm sure there's crossovers between animals.
 
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