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Modifying some of the free content which came with P11.2

Alisa

HW3D QAV Director (QAV Queen Bee)
Staff member
QAV-BEE
Thanks! I moved this to the Resources forum so the other thread and this can both thrive :)
 

eclark1894

Renowned
Oooh! Cool! I might have used that first one but 42 pixel samples? I'll be ready to retire before Superfly renders that with my CPU.
 

Hornet3d

Renowned
Oooh! Cool! I might have used that first one but 42 pixel samples? I'll be ready to retire before Superfly renders that with my CPU.

I have been using a material that seachnasaigh made quite some time ago to cast light and have used it in many of my sci-fi scenes. It works well for me but I have a different setup for the render, for a start I do not use 'Branched Path Tracing' as it seems to do very little for me than massively extending the render time. The other point is that using 'Progressive Refinement' you can stop the render at a point you are happy with it. The light casting is quite grainy at first, quite understandably, but it does reach a point where extra times make very little difference to the final render. A lot depends on the type of scene and other settings such as render dimension and the like, not to mention personal preference. I personally love the effect and adds a quality to the lighting that really creates a great scene. There may be a penalty to pay in render time but it is a price I am more than happy to pay.
 

seachnasaigh

Busy Bee
@eclark1894 : Oh, I should explain that as @Hornet3d knows, the idea is to set pixel samples unnecessarily high, then cancel the render and export image once the render is clean enough. Because it is irritating to set a lower pixel samples, and have the render complete with bad graininess still showing.

I *do* use branched path tracing, because that tells the render engine to use more rays/samples in places where complexity or special effects needs it. A BRT render of 15 pixel samples may look as clean (de-grained) as a 25 pixel sample render without it. Do *not* engage BRT if you are rendering with the video card; its "side street detours" in certain buckets may cause the video card to be (falsely) seen as unresponsive, crashing the render.

The render will clean away graininess sooner if you add a bit of Poser light; I only render without Poser lights so that you can see what the model itself does.

@Miss B : Working on Treehouse 2 now.:)
 

Hornet3d

Renowned
@eclark1894 : Oh, I should explain that as @Hornet3d knows, the idea is to set pixel samples unnecessarily high, then cancel the render and export image once the render is clean enough. Because it is irritating to set a lower pixel samples, and have the render complete with bad graininess still showing.

I *do* use branched path tracing, because that tells the render engine to use more rays/samples in places where complexity or special effects needs it. A BRT render of 15 pixel samples may look as clean (de-grained) as a 25 pixel sample render without it. Do *not* engage BRT if you are rendering with the video card; its "side street detours" in certain buckets may cause the video card to be (falsely) seen as unresponsive, crashing the render.

The render will clean away graininess sooner if you add a bit of Poser light; I only render without Poser lights so that you can see what the model itself does.

@Miss B : Working on Treehouse 2 now.:)

Thank you for the information, it may be that I was looking at the overall render rather than looking at the special effects areas so that I didn't notice the difference when using branched path tracing. I never render without a Poser light, usually only one but sometimes two, that said I understand why you do not in these circumstances.
 

Seliah (Childe of Fyre)

Running with the wolves.
CV-BEE
Contributing Artist
@eclark1894 : Oh, I should explain that as @Hornet3d knows, the idea is to set pixel samples unnecessarily high, then cancel the render and export image once the render is clean enough. Because it is irritating to set a lower pixel samples, and have the render complete with bad graininess still showing.

I *do* use branched path tracing, because that tells the render engine to use more rays/samples in places where complexity or special effects needs it. A BRT render of 15 pixel samples may look as clean (de-grained) as a 25 pixel sample render without it. Do *not* engage BRT if you are rendering with the video card; its "side street detours" in certain buckets may cause the video card to be (falsely) seen as unresponsive, crashing the render.

The render will clean away graininess sooner if you add a bit of Poser light; I only render without Poser lights so that you can see what the model itself does.

@Miss B : Working on Treehouse 2 now.:)
So that's what the branched path tracing is for! I've been trying to figure out exactly what it is/what it does for a long time now. Thank you!
 
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