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Little set back

pommerlis

Noteworthy
Contributing Artist
Just letting everybody know that I'm still here and working on allsorts of things but it is official now.
My laptop is fallen to pieces, meaning, it's getting old, certain keys on the keyboard no longer function, memory is failing etc.
Soooo, for as long as the laptop is still alive I'm busy saving and organizing my more then extensive Poser/Daz content onto my external drive - just incase- before I decide what to do. Since I'm getting older aswell my best option will be creating content in the winter time when we're home and occiasionally during spring/summer when we are at our summer residence on my desktop.
But I have been neglecting that beast a bit so I first need to check if I can still update it to windows 10 (- maybe 11) If not I'll have to see how far our funds stretch LOL
It's just one of those things I guess.
 

Hornet3d

Renowned
Sadly everything ages including us and usually it is only fine women and fine wine that improves with age. I hope you manage to get something sorted and you find a pattern of working that suits you. I would think Windows 10 is certainly possible but I am less confident with Windows 11 due the hardware requirements. My own system is fairly high spec and only about five years old but the neither the motherboard or the processor are supported with Window 11 so I will sit tight and see where this all leads.
 

Miss B

Drawing Life 1 Pixel at a Time
CV-BEE
Wishing you a speedy recover of your laptop. I went through this 2 years ago next month, when my 8-yr. old Win7 Pro was literally chugging along on it's last legs. It's not easy. I had avoided upgrading to Win10, and all of a sudden it was absolutely necessary. At least each time I've upgraded to a new Windows version, it was with a new desktop or laptop. I've never upgraded the OS on a computer that was still in working order, and don't ever want to.

Take your time, and you'll get everything worked out to your advantage. As far as Win11 goes, this 2-yr. old puppy doesn't have the necessary hardware either, but I'm in no rush to get Win11, so I'll sit it out as well.
 
This particular machine barely runs Win10. It;s the earlier desktop version of Miss B's Dell XPS and came with Win 8 point something or other. Vista maybe? It upgraded itself to Win 10 the minute I connected it to the net during setup. It's the most solid machine I've ever owned but it isn't going to be taking many modern upgrades.

My work box will upgrade to Win 11, but it won't be happening. There are simple built in tools I use every day in Windoze. 3D object viewer, paint.net, Movie Maker and more. They are all removed in W11 as are a few more things in an effort to streamline everything into one giant client/server application with data protection from cryptolockers demanding bitcoins from you to get your data back.

Even new systems may not show as compatible with W11 unless you allow system encryption to be done by Microsoft. The option for it is usually turned off in the BIOS and may require flashing to turn the option on as many manufacturers turn it off to speed up system startup. If you bought a "gaming" computer to get a better graphics card and a bit more RAM then I guarantee you Trusted Module Protection or whatever they call it is turned off in the BIOS.
 

pommerlis

Noteworthy
Contributing Artist
I think I will keep it with windows 10. I will first see if I an upgrade the old desktop, if not, I will have to use my puppy eyes on my spouse I guess LOL
Re-organizing all my files is going to be a long haul, I seem to have an embarrassing large amount of content.
 

Miss B

Drawing Life 1 Pixel at a Time
CV-BEE
This particular machine barely runs Win10. It;s the earlier desktop version of Miss B's Dell XPS and came with Win 8 point something or other. Vista maybe? It upgraded itself to Win 10 the minute I connected it to the net during setup. It's the most solid machine I've ever owned but it isn't going to be taking many modern upgrades.
Hi PDG, but where did you get the idea I have a Dell XPS computer. That's the model I would've gone with if I had gotten a new desktop computer.

This puppy is sold by Dell, but it's an Alienware laptop.
 
Sorry Miss B. I recall somewhere folk talking about the machines they had and their specs. Folk were complaining about Dells for some reason and I mistakenly thought your new (at the time) laptop was an XPS. I was drooling a bit as there was no way on Earth I was ever going to be able to purchase a new machine in what's left of my lifetime. Over COVID I've been able to cobble together a few parts to build a new box but it is still under powered for what I would like.
 

Miss B

Drawing Life 1 Pixel at a Time
CV-BEE
No problem sir. I thought you might have read a post I made where I was talking about the XPS, and assumed I had one. As I mentioned above, if I had wanted a new desktop, that is the one I would've gone for. I had a Dell Latitude years ago and liked it, but it got damaged, and I didn't have the time to wait for another delivery, so bought a Hewlett Packard at a local tech store.

I had that one for 8 years, but it started having major issues, so I went looking for a new one. I hadn't thought of Alienware as it's, so I'm told, mostly for gaming, which I don't do, BUT it had the power and hardware I wanted. Dell also has it's own G series for gaming, which is probably a little less expensive, but I liked what I saw when I saw the Alienware, so went with it, and I haven't been disappointed yet. :)
 

pommerlis

Noteworthy
Contributing Artist
@Miss B Would you advice a gaming computer for what we do? I'm asking because just in case I'm buying a new one I had never thought of that.
 

DanaTA

Extraordinary
I used to have a friend who would build my boxes custom. I'd get whatever I wanted/could afford. He passed away in 2012. I now go to the shop that he used. But I don't have the money for a new build, even though my monitor is starting to go. All the new monitors have HDMI and a new connection, my card doesn't have them, it has VGA or DVi connections. So, I'd need at least a new Nvidea card. Out of reach for me right now.

Dana

Thought I posted this the other day...
 

Miss B

Drawing Life 1 Pixel at a Time
CV-BEE
@Miss B Would you advice a gaming computer for what we do? I'm asking because just in case I'm buying a new one I had never thought of that.
I never thought of it either, I just went to Dell because my first laptop was a Dell, and except for the fact I dropped it twice, it probably would've lasted a few more years, so their computers are of a high quality.

Though they also sell their own gaming computer, Dell G Series, I wasn't looking for a specific model, and the Alienware showed up when I was searching on their site. I had heard of Alienware, and didn't know Dell was selling them, so Alienware may have decided to let Dell do the selling, while they do the manufacturing.

That said, I have been taking an online course in Blender that offers a lot of other courses, including Unreal, Unity and a couple of other gaming courses, and I have noticed a number of members in my Blender course are also taking one of the gaming courses. I don't know if it would be necessary, though for those who do major modeling work, have also modeled assets for use in gaming software. @Ken1171 would probably know more about that, as I know he's been doing work that can be used in games.

For the type of work that you do, I don't know that it's necessary. I know Dell has a lot of different models, and I'm sure one of the others might just fit for what you want it for, so though I'm really happy with this laptop, I wouldn't necessarily tell someone this is the one you absolutely need. Needless to say, cost is a major factor, and when I got this 2 years ago Thanksgiving weekend, I had a few extra bucks to spend, so I did. ;)
 

Ken1171

Wise
Contributing Artist
That said, I have been taking an online course in Blender that offers a lot of other courses, including Unreal, Unity and a couple of other gaming courses, and I have noticed a number of members in my Blender course are also taking one of the gaming courses. I don't know if it would be necessary, though for those who do major modeling work, have also modeled assets for use in gaming software. @Ken1171 would probably know more about that, as I know he's been doing work that can be used in games.
I have worked in the gaming industry as both game programmer and 3D artist. I don't know which I like the best, so I did both. :D

@Miss B Would you advice a gaming computer for what we do? I'm asking because just in case I'm buying a new one I had never thought of that.

When it comes to 3D modelling, such programs tend to require good CPU speed, GPU performance, and a sizeable RAM (at least 16GB). Those things mean more money, usually in a direct proportion. You want more juice, we have to pay more for it. That's why there are so many makes and models out there, so there will be something that will fit your budget.

If you already know your budget, then it's just a matter of finding what fits into it, and if it does want you want. If not, you might want to wait a bit longer and save money. On my side, it took me 2 years saving money just to get a new video card. That's usually how I do things - I just buy the parts I need from the brands I trust (pays off in the long run). Case airflow design is often overlooked, and if can dramatically reduce components lifespan (or worse) if not done right.

Beware of "gaming" computers - that definition is too vague, overused and abused everywhere. Sometimes they just use that label to overprice things, with no real value behind it. Basically everything is called that nowadays just to make it look more expensive. Those machines also tend to include things we don't need for 3D work that add to the cost. I tend to be very skeptical when it comes to such labels.
 
The two things that will make the most difference for the type of work most of us do is RAM and graphics card. Game machines have both. Most important thing right now is the graphics card. You want an Nvidia card with RTX and it's going to cost. The price of those boxes has doubled in the last year due to chip shortages. Like looking for a new game console. They make 'em but you'll have a hard time finding one. I bought a GeForce RTX 2070 july 2020 and it was less than $550 Canuk. Bucks. I see the same card for sale, at the same store I bought mine in; selling it for between $1500-$1700 right now in another tab. They are back orders. None in stock. They have an i5 gaming machine with a similar graphics card, 16 gig of RAM; and a 1TB solid state HD for $1999. Makes the gaming rig a good buy.

For the sake of the widest rang of graphics/3d software compatibility I must say stay away from AMD Raedon as a graphics option. Lots of reasons, but accelerated rendering and AI denoising options don't exist for those cards in most graphics software.

AMD Ryzen Threadripper CPUs on the other hand are great value for money if your software doesn't support hardware rendering as the more cores the better.

Can't say anything about Macs as I've never owned one.
 
Ken I agree with your assessment of "gaming computers" if you just go looking for such. There are very good AMD "gaming computers" but as I mentioned above; for 3D work their cards just don't cut it. Besides; doesn't everyone want to pay extra for the lights on their RAM and fans? For sure there is no need for a DVD drive. Just kidding. "Gaming" rigs do indeed have some strange priorities, but with the parts shortages and rising prices; some of them represent value.
 

Satira Capriccio

Renowned
CV-BEE
Contributing Artist
At the time I was shopping for my current computer, gaming computers weren't the best choice for what we do. I had an Alienware gaming computer at the time, and while it was great with MMORPG graphics, it couldn't render complex scenes, and I frequently had to do partial renders. When I replaced it, I went with the Dell Precision, which is Dell's line of graphics (CAD/architecture/CG) computers.

My Precision is still plenty powerful enough for rendering complex scenes in Poser, so while a few years ago, I was thinking about upgrading, in the end I chose not to.

Check out recommendations for computers intended for 3D modeling and rendering rather than gaming. You'll need a higher end computer if you plan to do animation, complex rendering, and 3d modeling. If you plan to do modeling, make sure you check out the requirements for the software you use or will use. You can get away with a lower end computer for something like Silo, but that computer may be inadequate for something like Modo.

Will you need the portability of a laptop or do you have the room for a desktop computer? (I'd rather pay for more power than portability. But that's not an option for everyone.)

Gaming computers that are marketed to younger gamers tend to focus on bells and whistles that appeal to younger players and not always on what's under the hood.
 

Miss B

Drawing Life 1 Pixel at a Time
CV-BEE
The two things that will make the most difference for the type of work most of us do is RAM and graphics card. Game machines have both. Most important thing right now is the graphics card. You want an Nvidia card with RTX and it's going to cost. The price of those boxes has doubled in the last year due to chip shortages. Like looking for a new game console. They make 'em but you'll have a hard time finding one. I bought a GeForce RTX 2070 july 2020 and it was less than $550 Canuk. Bucks. I see the same card for sale, at the same store I bought mine in; selling it for between $1500-$1700 right now in another tab. They are back orders. None in stock. They have an i5 gaming machine with a similar graphics card, 16 gig of RAM; and a 1TB solid state HD for $1999. Makes the gaming rig a good buy.
This laptop has the following, which is what sold it for me:

9th Generation Intel Core i7-9750H (6-Core, 12MB Cache, up to 4.5Ghz w/Turbo Boost)
M.2 1TB PCIe Class 40 Solid State Drive
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6GB GDDR6
16GB, 2x8GB, DDR4, 2666MHz

I had specifically told the Dell salesperson I didn't want the RTX because the software I mostly used at the time (Poser) was having issues with recognizing the RTX system, and he recommended the newest (at the time) GTX. Unfortunately, the GTX 1660 Ti runs on the same system as the RTX, so I had to wait for Poser to be updated to recognize it anyway, so was using the onboard CPU for a while.

Again, this is just a laptop. I'm sure a Desktop system can be found that's similar, but not necessarily for gaming.
 

Miss B

Drawing Life 1 Pixel at a Time
CV-BEE
At the time I was shopping for my current computer, gaming computers weren't the best choice for what we do. I had an Alienware gaming computer at the time, and while it was great with MMORPG graphics, it couldn't render complex scenes, and I frequently had to do partial renders. When I replaced it, I went with the Dell Precision, which is Dell's line of graphics (CAD/architecture/CG) computers.
Dell Precisions are very good. Back when I had my Dell, circa 2005-2011, I bought a Latitude because, back then, I was doing more Web Design work than 3D graphics.
 

Ken1171

Wise
Contributing Artist
I wouldn't recommend laptops for 3D rendering for 3 reasons:

* Performance is generally cut down to preserve battery life.
* 3D rendering can overheat them (reduce lifespan) due to the small form factor, which can lead to poor airflow.
* They can be more expensive than more powerful desktops.
 

pommerlis

Noteworthy
Contributing Artist
On my side, it took me 2 years saving money just to get a new video card. That's usually how I do things - I just buy the parts I need from the brands I trust (pays off in the long run)
I've never ever done that, buy parts and build them in myself. I wouldn't know where to start.
I've always bought a PC in a store or someone build it for me. I am pre-computer era you know and everything I know so far is self taught. So buying parts and building them into a PC would be the next step for me.


9th Generation Intel Core i7-9750H (6-Core, 12MB Cache, up to 4.5Ghz w/Turbo Boost)
M.2 1TB PCIe Class 40 Solid State Drive
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6GB GDDR6
16GB, 2x8GB, DDR4, 2666MHz
I will keep these specs in mind, esspecially the Nvidia since I do intend to use Daz more often - even though that software and I just don't get along.
I think for Poser it will be better aswell.

Thank you everyone for the great advice, I can sure use it.
 
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